The Writing GPS: A Writing Framework That Makes Your Writing Ridiculously Good

The Writing GPS: A Writing Framework That Makes Your Writing Ridiculously Good

Writing — Tue., Oct. 25, 2022 Writing can feel overwhelming and daunting, but having a process in place to guide you can make it much easier. The Writing GPS presented in the new edition of Everybody Writes 2 is a framework for longer pieces of writing and includes 17 steps. The required minimum steps (in gold) are Goal, Ask So what?, Organize, First draft, Second draft, Headline and Publish. The additional steps (in orange) add extra magic and adventure to the journey. These include finding data and examples, walking away, rewriting to one person, adding voice, editing with AI and reading it out loud. The Writing GPS puts the writer in the driver's seat, allowing them to navigate their own way. The Writing GPS is a great guide for creating great content. It starts with Goal and Ask So what? to reframe the goal to relate it to the reader. From there, you seek out data, organize it, write an ugly first draft and move away from it. Draft 3 should be written with your reader in mind, while Draft 4 should add voice, style, fun and sparkle. A great headline or title should come next, before running it through an AI editing tool and sending it to your editor. Reading it out loud and eyeballing for scanning/scrolling come after that. Publish it with a call to action and let it go with love. Feelings of joy and regret often come post-publishing, and it's important to forgive yourself and take note of any lessons to apply next time. The Writing GPS is a great way to put the discombobulated thoughts into a coherent piece of writing. While it may seem like a lot of steps, each one adds something valuable to the journey. While the Writing GPS is a great guide, it's important to take what works and adapt it to your own writing process. It's also important to remember that there is always light at the end of the tunnel. ... continue reading below
Sign up for free to read the full article.
Enter your email address to continue reading

The Writing GPS: A Writing Framework That Makes Your Writing Ridiculously Good

Don't worry ... it's FREE!

Already a member? Sign in now.

Related Articles

How to Write Concisely: Nine Tips

How to Write Concisely: Nine Tips

Learn how to write concisely with these nine essential tips. Enhance your content's clarity and effectiveness. Read less here...

Effective Writing Skills in Public Relations: Three Tips

Effective Writing Skills in Public Relations: Three Tips

Writing for public relations can be a challenge, especially when you're not familiar with your client's industry. Check out three tips for successful PR writing.

Five Tips for Writing Web Content That Captures Attention

Five Tips for Writing Web Content That Captures Attention

Web content is different from other forms of writing, and people consume it differently. The best-practices outlined in this article can help you create content that boosts your brand, improves SEO, and captures people's attention.

Social Distancing Is Changing the Way We Write. That's a Problem.

Social Distancing Is Changing the Way We Write. That's a Problem.

Our reality—living in a state of isolation, bombarded with messages about the importance of maintaining separation—is influencing the way we think and communicate. Our lack of social interaction is limiting our ability to communicate effectively. Including in our writing.

Nine Cringey Mistakes in Marketing Writing and Content

Nine Cringey Mistakes in Marketing Writing and Content

Creating content that engages readers isn't easy, especially today. In our haste to create fresh, useful content, we make mistakes. But our audiences don't want to waste time on substandard writing. Avoid these nine common writing and content mistakes.

How to Stop Annoying Your Customers With Useless CTAs and Instead Write CTAs That Convert

In a world full of "READ THIS!" "BUY NOW!" and "CLICK HERE!" sometimes the only action customers want to take is to click away. And we marketers shouldn't blame them. So, what do we do? How else can we inspire action?

Subscribe to the MarketingProfs Today newsletter